Bugger’s Baroque

My love of the baroque (and the subsequent revivals) is long standing, so much so that I built my previous career as a decorative painter identifying my craft as Neo-Baroque. As a studio painter I still find the allure of the baroque irresistible and in my latest work Reflection of a Harsh Super Ego , I attempted to capture the florid excess of the period.

The Reflection of a Harsh Super Ego
2017
Mixed media: acrylic paint, recycled fabric, thread, feather , fiber-fill
50 by 32 by 6 inches

This work is an extension of my “stuffed painting” series which constitutes a large part of my latest body of work Fairyland. Ostensibly this latest piece is a  reflection upon such cheery topics as existential angst, mortality, self-worth/esteem and of course, aging. It is also hopefully funny, a memento mori with wit.

Utilizing fabric allows me to explore the funeral lushness found in over- upholstered baroque furnishings, particularly the decidedly non cozy state beds:

Design for state bed by Daniel Marot, 1661-1752

 

Daniel Marot, the designer of the state bed above was a master of baroque theatricality. His designs for court furnishings are astounding , so inventive, whirling madness yet an underlying balance. I can easily stare at his compositions for hours, and I have. My aforementioned decorative work was directly influenced by Marot and his contemporary Jean Berain.

Design by Jean Berain, 1640-1711
Pair of decorative cartouches
1999
Naples, FL

So it was of little surprise that I would return to the wonderful fripperies of Marot and Berain. I particularly admire the baroque compositions that incorporate a writhing pool of figures, sensuously colliding with one another yet all forming a cartouche, a mirror frame or cabinet. The mad fusion of sculpture, ornament and perhaps some functionality.

Design by Daniel Marot.
André Charles Boulle, 1642-1732
Getty Center, Los Angeles

My fripperies and atlantes may not be of ormolu, ivory or silk but they are roiling about in a nutty baroque manner.

Detail from “The Reflection of a Harsh Super Ego”

 

In his excellent Baroque Baroque , the art historian Stephen Calloway refers to a  British baroque revival as “bugger’s baroque”, apparently a witty retort to queen-ish  decorative excess. I like to think my “mirror” might have earned that title. Being that The Reflection of a Harsh Super Ego is a further exploration of  “sissy” arts, and an element of a larger body of work called Fairyland, I think it has earned that distinction. 

Reflection of a Harsh Super Ego will be part of an upcoming solo show at Ave.50 Gallery, 131 N. Avenue 50, Los Angeles, CA 90042

Opening reception July 8 2017, 7-10 pm.

The Reflection of a Harsh Super Ego
2017
Mixed media: acrylic paint, recycled fabric, thread, feather , fiber-fill
50 by 32 by 6 inches